IPCC Latest dictums on Renewable Energy show serious flaws

From the Blog of Roger Pielke, Jr.

The IPCC has just issued a new summary for policy makers for a forthcoming special report on renewable energy that appears (indirectly and obliquely) to finally admit that we just do not have the technology necessary to achieve low targets for the stabilization of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (e.g., something like 450 ppm).

The IPCC does note that there are obstacles — both social and technological — that must be overcome, and appears to make some key assumptions about how this might occur. Even to reach the scenarios envisioned the report assumes a massive investment in energy technologies, from well over $100 billion per year to $500 billion per year starting yesterday.

The four illustrative scenarios analyzed in detail in this Special Report estimate global cumulative RE investments (in the power generation sector only) ranging from USD2005 1,360 to 5,100 billion for the decade 2011 to 2020, and from USD2005 1,490 to 7,180 billion for the decade 2021 to 2030.

Read More at Roger Pielke, Jr’s Blog

See also the public comments on the above webpage, which discuss how the mainstream media put a different spin on this latest UNIPCC Report. Download a copy of the report itself, and then read it and You decide. Are they once again just publishing hokum and dogma? How long can we all be expected to pay for this circus of despair, headed up by that Railroad engineer chappie? Come in “Casey Jones”, your train is about to crash !

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